Uffizi Library

Address

Loggiato degli Uffizi

50122 Firenze

email: ga-uff.biblioteca@beniculturali.it

Opening hours

Tuesday: 09:00am – 05:00pm
Wednesday: 09:00am – 01:00pm
Thursday: 09:00am – 01:00pm

We inform that the Library will be closed throughout the month of August and will reopen on the 5th of Semptember 2017.

We apologize for the inconvenience.

Established in the second half of the 18th century by Grand Duke Peter Leopold of Habsburg-Lorraine, the Library had been originally housed in the Foyer of the Medicean Theatre designed by Giorgio Vasari.

On December 16, 1998 it was moved into the restored premises of the former Magliabechiana Library.

It preserves many manuscripts belonging to the collections of the Florentine museums and is specialized in the historical-artistic publications for scholars and researchers.

The total number of items is 78,600, including: 470 manuscripts, 5 incunabula, 192 sixteenth-century editions, 1,445 books printed between 1601 and 1800 and 1,136 periodicals (approximately 140 are still printed).

Catalogue

The catalogue has been digitalised since 1996 in the Iris database.
Iris is an inter-library association comprising: the Berenson Library of Villa I Tatti, the Library of the Fondazione Roberto Longhi, the Library of the Netherlands Institute for Art History, the Library of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure (Workshop of semi-precious stones), the Library of the Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento (National Institute for Renaissance Studies) and the Library of the International University of Art.

According to the latest estimate of June 30, 2003 the bibliographic records of the Uffizi Library entered in the IRIS database amounted to 40,000. The digitalisation of the remaining 23,000 items is ongoing.

The Iris database can be consulted online at the following website:

›› http://iris-aleph.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/F

 

Fondo Carocci

Available online, the Fondo Carocci (Carocci Archive) of the Uffizi Library provides fundamental information about Medieval Florence before the renovation that took place in the city centre at the end of the 19th century.

›› Consult the records